Tag Archives: Storage

Apple grabs icloud.net domain to solidify links to sync and storage service

Apple this week took administrative control of the icloud.net domain, the last notable web address it did not govern that users could have linked with its online sync and storage service.

According to WHOIS searches today, Apple acquired control of icloud.net on Tuesday.

Apple already ruled the primary top-level domains for iCloud, the cross-device, cross-OS service that stores files generated by iOS and macOS, and more importantly, synchronizes everything from Safari browser bookmarks to photographs between iPhones, iPads and Macs. Apple is on record as the owner of the domains icloud.com, icloud.org, icloud.us and icloud.eu, for example.

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CIO Cloud Computing

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Stock Up on Flash Storage During Amazon’s One-Day Sale

Transcend Gold Box

One can never have enough flash storage, especially when Amazon’s selling it for this cheap. Today only, you can take your pick of Transcend storage products marked down to great low prices.

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Amazon Simple Storage Service spurs on-premises storage

As it closes in on becoming a $ 10 billion run rate per year enterprise IT juggernaut, the cloud computing platform has changed the IT landscape …


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DataON Storage Expands Hyper-Converged Infrastructure with Microsoft…

DataON Storage achieves Microsoft certification of the CiB-9224 F1 all-flash Cluster-in-a-Box for Windows Server 2012 R2, Storage Spaces. Built on the inaugural certified software-defined Storage…

(PRWeb May 11, 2016)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/DataON_Hyper-Converged/All-Flash_Array_Appliance/prweb13399540.htm


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Supermicro® Debuts Simply Double Storage Architecture Optimized for Cloud, HPC, Data Center …

… to support a wide range of applications in Cloud Computing, Web Hosting, VDI, data analytics, HPC, Video Streaming and CDN applications.


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Apple drops iCloud prices, matches rival storage services from Google and Microsoft

For the second year in a row, Apple reduced prices for its expanded iCloud storage plans, putting costs in line with rivals like Google, Microsoft and Dropbox.

Apple announced changes to iCloud extra storage pricing earlier this month at the event where it unveiled new iPhones, the larger iPad Pro and a revamped Apple TV.

Although the Cupertino, Calif., company did not boost the amount of free storage space — as Computerworld speculated it might — and instead continued to provide just 5GB of iCloud space gratis, it bumped up the $ 0.99 per month plan from 20GB to 50GB, lowered the price of the 200GB plan by 25 percent to $ 2.99 monthly, and halved the 1TB plan’s price to $ 9.99.

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InfoWorld Cloud Computing


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IBM Storage with OpenStack Brings Simplicity and Robustness to Cloud

data center cloud Without storage, we would have no digital data. From being very much—and so-named at the time—a peripheral to early …


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Cloudera is building a new open-source storage engine called Kudu, sources say

Cloudera at the Black Hat conference in August.

Big data company Cloudera is preparing to launch major new open-source software for storing and serving lots of different kinds of unstructured data, with an eye toward challenging heavyweights in the database business, VentureBeat has learned.

The storage engine, Kudu, is meant as an alternative to the widely used Hadoop Distributed File System and the Hadoop-oriented HBase NoSQL database, borrowing characteristics from both, according to a copy of a slide deck on Kudu’s design goals that VentureBeat has obtained. The technology will be released as Apache-licensed open-source software, the slides show.

Cloudera has had one of its early employees leading a small team to work on Kudu for the past two years, and the company has begun pitching the software to customers before an open-source release at the end of this month, a source familiar with the matter told VentureBeat.

From VentureBeat

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That source and others believe Kudu could present a new threat to data warehouses from Teradata and IBM’s PureData (formerly Netezza), and other vendors. It may also be used as a highly scalable in-memory database that can handle massively parallel processing (MPP) workloads, not unlike HP’s Vertica and VoltDB, the sources say. And one day Kudu — which works across multiple data centers with RAM and fast solid-state drives (SSDs) — could even play a part in backup and disaster recovery.

Cloudera declined to comment.

However Cloudera chooses to market Kudu, it’s clear that the software is a big step forward for the company, not only in the company’s efforts to outdo other Hadoop vendors, but also in its quest to become a longstanding player in enterprise software.

Not that Cloudera is a nobody. It’s worth almost $ 5 billion, according to one recent estimate, it has considerable backing from Intel, and it’s been positioning itself as a competitor to much larger database companies, like IBM and Oracle. But the fact is, fellow Hadoop vendor Hortonworks has gained credibility after it went public last year, and Hadoop company MapR is still around, too.

Cloudera recently doubled down on the rising Apache Spark open-source big data processing framework, but Spark is something Cloudera has been working on for years. And a few months ago, Cloudera brought new Python capability to Hadoop, following its acquisition of DataPad last year. Those are important efforts, but Kudu is something entirely new, something that can give the company freshness as it grows toward an initial public offering.

So what is Kudu, then?

It’s “nearly as fast as raw HDFS for scans” and, at the same time, “nearly as fast as HBase for random access,” according to one slide from a presentation on Kudu’s design goals. But Kudu is not meant to be a drop-in substitute for HDFS or HBase. “There are still places where these systems will be optimal, and Cloudera will continue to support and invest in them,” a slide says.

Kudu could be used for time-series data, or real-time reporting, or model building, according to another slide.

And it’s important to note that Kudu isn’t a SQL query engine for pulling up specific data. Cloudera has Impala for that, and others have Hive for that. Kudu has an “early integration” with Impala, and Spark support is coming, according to a slide.

The Kudu application programming interface (API) works with Java — the common language of Hadoop — as well as C++. Kudu’s architecture allows for operation across sites, according to one slide. That makes it comparable to Google’s Spanner and the Spanner-inspired CockroachDB. That could make Kudu a great choice for big companies looking to store their big data around the world.

Is Kudu well adopted, though? No, not yet.

“Looking for beta customers,” a slide says.

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Amazon rolls out cold cloud storage option

Amazon Web Services today launched a new, less-expensive flavor of its cloud-based object storage service meant for data that is infrequently accessed (IA).

+ MORE AT NETWORK WORLD: All aboard the SS Dreamforce +

Amazon’s Simple Storage Service (S3) IA is an alternative to the company’s standard S3 offering and its Glacier service. Amazon’s three storage offerings now include: S3 for fast access to data; S3 IA, which is less expensive than S3 with a slight tradeoff in availability; and Glacier, which offers even less expensive prices, with high availability but the tradeoff of long latency for retrievals.

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Cloud Computing

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Storage spending veers toward cloud

The cloud is where the action is in enterprise storage.

Sales are way up for little-known manufacturers that sell directly to big cloud companies like Google and Facebook, while the market for traditional external storage systems is shrinking, according to research company IDC. 

Internet giants and service providers typically don’t use specialized storage platforms in their sprawling data centers. Instead, they buy vast amounts of capacity in the form of generic hardware that’s controlled by software. As users flock to cloud-based services, that’s a growing business. 

Revenue for original design manufacturers that sell directly to hyperscale data-center operators grew by 25.8 percent to more than US$ 1 billion in the second quarter, according to the latest global IDC report on enterprise storage systems. Overall industry revenue rose just 2.1 percent from last year’s second quarter, reaching $ 8.8 billion.

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CIO Cloud Computing


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