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Toshiba shares to be removed from special watch list: Nikkei

TOKYO (Reuters) – Shares of Toshiba Corp are to be removed from a special Tokyo Stock Exchange watch list, the Nikkei reported on Wednesday.

Toshiba has been on the “securities on alert” list since its 2015 accounting scandal.

Reporting by Chris Gallagher

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Takeway.com to increase commission rates from Jan 1

(Reuters) – Dutch meal delivery firm Takeaway.com said it would increase its commission rates from Jan. 1 and that it expects this to have a 5 percent positive effect on its revenue growth.

Takeaway.com also plans to increase investments in Germany and other markets in the fourth quarter of 2017, it said in its third-quarter trading update on Tuesday.

Reporting by Camille Raynaud; Editing by Subhranshu Sahu

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Tax Reform Proposal Gets Mixed Reviews From Small Business Owners

The Republican-backed tax proposal announced last week addresses concerns of some small business groups but also raises questions that it could create a tax loophole for wealthy people.

The proposal would change the way some company owners — sole proprietors, partners and owners of what are called S corporations — are taxed. They report business income on their individual 1040 forms and under current law, can be taxed at a rate up to 39.6 percent. Many small business advocates have long objected to the fact that some of these owners pay a higher tax rate than corporations whose rates currently top out at 35 percent.

Under the GOP proposal, the tax rate on the businesses known as pass-throughs would be 25 percent. The corporate rate would be 20 percent.

Small business advocates were split over the plan. The National Federation of Independent Business welcomed it, but others objected.

“The current proposal leaves a disparity by offering pass-through entities a 25 percent tax on business income while dropping the corporate rate to 20 percent,” said Todd McCracken, CEO of the National Small Business Association. “We hope to work with tax writers to find ways to close that gap.”

The pass-through provision has already encountered criticism among Democrats who say it would enable wealthy Americans to structure their finances in a way that would dramatically lower their tax bills. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said it would allow hedge funds to “to convert ordinary income into low-rate pass-through income.”

The NSBA was happy with some other proposals, including an end to the estate tax, which can force the heirs of company owners to sell a business or place it in debt in order to pay the government.

The Small Business Majority said the plan would not help most small companies.

“The current top rate is paid by less than 2 percent of pass-through business owners. Nearly 9 in 10 businesses that pass through their income already pay at the 25 percent rate or less,” said the group’s CEO, John Arensmeyer.

The plan would simplify business taxes, encourage business investment and increase owners’ confidence, the Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council said.

“High confidence will drive investment, risk-taking, bigger economic growth and wage growth,” said Karen Kerrigan, the group’s CEO.

The overall tax proposal faces an uncertain path through Congress although it has the backing of GOP leaders and President Donald Trump. Another provision in the overall plan that is being criticized is a proposal to eliminate the deduction for state and local taxes.

OPTMISTIC ABOUT TRADE

Small and mid-sized U.S. businesses that export their goods and services generally anticipate healthy growth in their overseas sales in the next five years. That’s the finding of a survey of 501 exporters released Monday by American Express.

Seventy-seven percent of the exporters who took part in the survey expect revenue from overseas sales to increase in the next five years, on average by nearly 30 percent. International trade is a significant part of their business — on average 36 percent of annual revenue comes from other countries.

Global economics and politics are a concern to these companies, with nearly 80 percent saying changing economics is a significant challenge. Thirty percent said Britain’s planned exit from the European Community will make them more cautious about international trade.

The survey, which questioned companies with total annual revenue between $ 250,000 to under $ 1 billion, was conducted in August.

PAID SICK LEAVE

Rhode Island has become the eighth state to require employers to give their staffers paid time off when they’re sick. Gov. Gina Raimondo signed a bill Thursday giving staffers at businesses with at least 18 employees three days of paid sick leave in 2018, four in 2019 and five in 2020. Workers can also use the time to care for ill relatives.

A growing number of states and cities have enacted laws that give workers paid sick leave, which is not required under federal law. Rhode Island’s neighbors, Connecticut and Massachusetts, also have sick leave laws, as do Vermont, California, Oregon, Arizona and Washington state.

–The Associated Press

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IDG Contributor Network: Lesson from AWS outage: stop putting your eggs in the same basket

It happened again.

Amazon Web Services (AWS) went down yesterday for hours,  bringing down a huge chunk of the internet with it. I didn’t realize at the time that AWS was the reason that I was not able to play the latest episode of Supergirl on my Apple TV. And it was not just the iCloud that was affected. It was not just the small sites. Big players were hit big time, including Apple, Adobe, Docker’s Registry Hub, GitHub, GitLab, Quora, Medium, Signal, Slack, Imgur, Twitch.tv…and many more.

This is not the first time AWS has gone down for hours, bringing everyone down with them. And it won’t be the last time.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


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5 lessons from Amazon’s S3 cloud blunder – and how to prepare for the next one

According to internet monitoring platform Catchpoint, Amazon Web Service’s Simple Storage Service (S3) experienced a three hour and 39 minute disruption on Tuesday that had cascading effects across other Amazon cloud services and many internet sites that rely on the popular cloud platform.

“S3 is like air in the cloud,” says Forrester analyst Dave Bartoletti; when it goes down many websites can’t breathe. But disruptions, errors and outages are a fact of life in the cloud. Bartoletti says there’s no reason to panic: “This is not a trend,” he notes. “S3 has been so reliable, so secure, it’s been the sort of crown jewel of Amazon’s cloud.“

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


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5 lessons from Amazon’s S3 cloud blunder – and how to prepare for the next one

According to internet monitoring platform Catchpoint, Amazon Web Service’s Simple Storage Service (S3) experienced a three hour and 39 minute disruption on Tuesday that had cascading effects across other Amazon cloud services and many internet sites that rely on the popular cloud platform.

“S3 is like air in the cloud,” says Forrester analyst Dave Bartoletti; when it goes down many websites can’t breathe. But disruptions, errors and outages are a fact of life in the cloud. Bartoletti says there’s no reason to panic: “This is not a trend,” he notes. “S3 has been so reliable, so secure, it’s been the sort of crown jewel of Amazon’s cloud.“

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


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5 lessons from Amazon’s S3 cloud blunder – and how to prepare for the next one

According to internet monitoring platform Catchpoint, Amazon Web Service’s Simple Storage Service (S3) experienced a three hour and 39 minute disruption on Tuesday that had cascading effects across other Amazon cloud services and many internet sites that rely on the popular cloud platform.

“S3 is like air in the cloud,” says Forrester analyst Dave Bartoletti; when it goes down many websites can’t breathe. But disruptions, errors and outages are a fact of life in the cloud. Bartoletti says there’s no reason to panic: “This is not a trend,” he notes. “S3 has been so reliable, so secure, it’s been the sort of crown jewel of Amazon’s cloud.“

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

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Spotify takes a cue from Tidal with hi-fi streaming option

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Facebook copies Snapchat, and Spotify copies Tidal. 

The top music streaming service is planning to introduce lossless audio — or CD-quality music — to subscribers for a higher monthly price, according to a report in The Verge

That report was based on a Spotify user source who got the option to sign up in what looked like a test of potential pricing, and some Reddit users who did, too. A Spotify spokesperson told the publication that “We are always testing new products and offers but have no news to share at this time.” Spotify gave the same statement to Mashable

The pricing test offered users an upgrade to high-quality audio for between $ 5 and $ 10 more per month than the usual $ 10-a-month Spotify Premium. That would be $ 15 to $ 20 a month total for lossless audio Spotify subscribers.  Read more…

More about Tech, Music Streaming, Tidal, Spotify, and Business


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Amazon S3 Internet outage unleashes flood of apologies — from others

While Amazon Web Services hasn’t yet issued an apology via its social media channels regarding big problems today with its Simple Storage Service (S3), the company’s customers have turned to Twitter and Facebook to apologize to their own customers — while pointing the finger at AWS.

AWS, via its @awscloud Twitter account, did alert customers that “S3 is experiencing high error rates. We are working hard on recovering.” That was posted a bit after 2pm EST and Amazon has since posted a few updates, including a note about the status dashboard recovering.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


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The most cringe-worthy quotes from CEO Travis Kalanick on Uber’s sexist work culture

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Uber CEO Travis Kalanick has a history of cringe-worthy comments. Easiest example — “Boob-er” in reference to a “women on demand” service — and here’s some more

When he’s not putting his foot in his mouth, Kalanick is known for particularly aggressive business tactics, which is one of the reasons why venture capitalists have given him more than $ 13 billion in funding to build out this ride-hailing company. Chris Sacca, an investor in Uber and other tech companies, wrote in a guest post in Fortune: “He doesn’t sleep. He doesn’t lose focus. He will even forget to eat. He executes again and again, inspiring those around him to have the same passion for the end game as he does.” Read more…

More about Women In Tech, Silicon Valley, Delete Uber, Travis Kalanick, and Uber


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