Tag Archives: Facebook

Facebook Friends With Your Co-Workers? Survey Shows Your Boss Probably Disapproves

You and your colleagues pitch in together on difficult projects, lunch together, and have drinks together after work. You probably think it’s the most natural thing in the world to friend them on Facebook or follow them on Twitter or Instagram. Your boss, though, probably thinks you shouldn’t.

That’s the surprising result of a survey of 1,006 employees and 307 senior managers conducted by staffing company OfficeTeam. Survey respondents were asked how appropriate it was to connect with co-workers on various social media platforms. It turns out that bosses and their employees have very different answers to this question.

When it comes to Facebook, 77 percent of employees thought it was either “very appropriate” or “somewhat appropriate” to be Facebook friends with your work colleagues, but only 49 percent of senior managers agreed. That disagreement carries over to other social media platforms. Sixty-one percent of employees thought it was fine to follow a co-worker on Twitter, but only 34 percent of bosses agreed. With Instagram, 56 percent of employees, but only 30 percent of bosses thought following a co-worker was appropriate. Interestingly, the one social platform bosses and employees seem to almost agree about is Snapchat, with 34 percent of employees thinking it was fine to connect with colleagues, and 26 percent of bosses thinking so too.

What should you do if you want to connect with a colleague on social media–if you get a connection request from a colleague? Here are a few options:

1. Use LinkedIn.

LinkedIn was not included in the OfficeTeam survey, but because it’s a professional networking tool, few bosses will object to you connecting with coworkers there. And LinkedIn has many of the same features as Facebook–you can even send instant messages to your contacts.

2. Keep your social media connections secret.

Most social networks give users the option to limit who can see what they post and who their other connections are. You can use this option to keep your social media interactions limited to the people you choose. If that doesn’t include your boss, he or she may never know that you and your co-workers are connected.

3. Talk to your boss.

He or she may not agree with the surveyed bosses who said connecting on social media was inappropriate, in which case there’s no problem. And if your boss does object, he or she may have some good reasons you hadn’t thought of to keep your professional life separate from your social media one. The only way to find out is to ask.

4. Consider the future.

It may be perfectly fine to connect with your co-workers on social media when you’re colleagues. But what happens if you get promoted to a leadership position? You may regret giving your former co-workers access to all the thoughts you share on Facebook or Twitter. So if a colleague sends you a social media request, or you want to make one yourself, take a moment to think it through. Will you be sorry one day–when you’re the boss yourself?

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Wisconsin, Michigan were key targets of Russia-linked ads on Facebook: CNN

(Reuters) – Russia-linked Facebook ads during last year’s U.S. presidential election mainly focussed on the states of Michigan and Wisconsin, CNN reported on Tuesday.

The ads targeted key demographic groups and used divisive messages including promoting anti-Muslim sentiment, the report said, citing sources. cnn.it/2klAM2y

Wisconsin and Michigan were among the handful of battleground states that helped Trump win the presidency over Democratic rival Hillary Clinton. Trump carried Wisconsin by 22,748 votes and Michigan by 10,700 votes.

About 10 million people in the United States saw politically divisive ads on Facebook which were purchased in Russia in the months before and after the U.S. election, Facebook said on Monday as social media companies face calls for increased regulation and more transparency to open up the opaque world of online political ads.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller and congressional committees are investigating possible links between President Donald Trump’s campaign and Russia. Russia denies meddling in the election.

A representative from Facebook could not be reached for comment outside regular U.S. business hours.

Reporting by Kanishka Singh; Editing by Sunil Nair

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Facebook enlists AI tech to help prevent suicide

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Can Facebook use all that it knows about us to help stop someone from committing suicide?

It’s been more than a rhetorical question since January, after a video, pulled from the social media platform Live.Me and shared on Facebook, showed a 12-year-old Katelyn Nicole Davis taking her own lifeFacebook couldn’t control the spread of the video and appeared unsure if it even violated its own terms of service.

A month later, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s 6,000 word global community manifesto made it  clear that Facebook is ready to take on a more parental role, one that acknowledges its incredible influence and impact over nearly 2 billion people around the worldZuckerberg wrote: Read more…

More about Suicide, Facebook, Tech, and Facebook


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The Women’s March Defines Protest in the Facebook Age

The Women’s March Defines Protest in the Facebook Age

It was a protest as sprawling, diverse, and ubiquitous as the platform that spawned it. The post The Women’s March Defines Protest in the Facebook Age appeared first on WIRED.
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Salesforce’s Quip Acquires Unity&Variety, Reuniting Facebook Designers

Quip, the workplace productivity company Salesforce acquired for a reported $ 750 million in August, made an acquisition of its own today.  Quip bought Unity&Variety, a software company founded in 2015 by Facebook veterans Drew Hamlin, Joey Flynn and Andy Chung. Quip  officials said the deal will enhance its creative and

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Facebook has a new plan to bring cheap internet access to India

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Facebook is launching a new scheme to bring cheap internet access to rural India, just months after net neutrality protestors blocked the company’s plan to provide free internet to millions in the country. 

The company is currently testing Express Wi-Fi in India. The service, according to Facebook, will allow people to buy fast, reliable and affordable data packages without shelling out hundreds of rupees each month. 

In January, India’s telecoms regulator rejected Facebook’s Free Basics program after more than a million people registered complaints abut the plan, which would have given free access to specific websites chosen by Facebook.  Read more…

More about Business, India, Free Basics, and Facebook


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Facebook and Unity team up to launch a Steam competitor


Facebook is preparing to take on Steam for casual gaming. The company today announced the Facebook PC Gaming Platform, a downloadable desktop hub for games made in partnership with Unity. The platform is actually an update to the Facebook Games Arcade beta from earlier in May. And while the company is remaining fairly tight-lipped, TechCrunch provides some details on what to expect. The platform is meant to provide a focused place for browsing your games, without being distracted by the News Feed and custom notifications. And while the first batch of games will likely be of the casual variety as developers move…

This story continues at The Next Web


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Microsoft, Facebook to Jointly Build Subsea Cable for Faster Internet

“As the world is increasingly moving toward a future based on cloud computing, Microsoft continues to invest in our cloud infrastructure to meet current …

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Facebook Renames Its Controversial Internet.org App

Facebook Renames Its Controversial Internet.org App

Facebook is rebranding its most predominant—and controversial—effort to connect the unconnected.

The post Facebook Renames Its Controversial Internet.org App appeared first on WIRED.




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