IDG Contributor Network: Raspberry Pi Foundation announces the best return gift

The first Raspberry Pi device was released on February 29, 2012. Celebrating the fifth anniversary of the credit card sized, single-board computer, the Raspberry Pi Foundation has announced the perfect return gift: Raspberry Pi Zero W.

You guessed it right, the W in the name stands for “wireless.” This is a new version of Raspberry Pi Zero that comes with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth capabilities at a mere $ 10.

A few days ago, I spent $ 12 to get a Bluetooth dongle for my Xbox One. Here I am getting a full fledged computer with wireless capabilities for less than what I paid for the dongle.

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With Half A Billion Customers Lost, McDonald’s Gambles On Mobile Ordering To Get Them Back

McDonald’s has always boasted about the billions of customers it has served. But now it has a big problem: the 500 million potential visitors it estimates it’s lost in the past five years. It hopes mobile ordering and curbside delivery will lure them back.


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How Many Plane Crashes Have There Ever Been?

Roughly how many plane crashes do you estimate, based on some statistics, there have been in total? This question was originally answered on Quora by Tom Farrier.


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Marketo: All Customers Now Have Our New Engagement Platform (Project Orion)

Marketo: All Customers Now Have Our New Engagement Platform (Project Orion)

Marketo today took steps to address confusion surrounding the rollout of its major platform re-architecture project — but stopped short of resolving all of its customers’ questions about what was initially called Project Orion. As of today, the San Mateo, Calif.

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GitHub Overhauled Its Pricing Plans Because Customers Now Want The Cloud

GitHub has revamped its pricing plans to reflect rising interest from big businesses in storing their core code on the cloud, a shift that CEO Chris Wanstrath says was impossible five years ago.


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Man sentenced to 30 days in prison for accidentally hitting woman with his drone

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Attention drone operators: Watch your aim with those things or you could end up in behind bars.

Yeah, we’re serious. Paul Skinner, a 38-year-old Seattle man who accidentally knocked a woman unconscious with his drone back in 2015 has received a 30-day prison sentence along with a $ 500 fine, after being charged with reckless endangerment back in January.

When Skinner, an aerial photographer, flew his two pound, 18-by-18 inch drone — which retailed for $ 1,200 — into a crowd of people at 2015 Seattle Pride Parade, it accidentally fell on top of a 25-year-old woman’s head, knocking her out. Read more…

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IDG Contributor Network: SaaS is eating the infrastructure world

In many ways, we can compare the future of the software world to the emergence of self-driving cars. Just as we’re faced with questions around a unified set of operational standards for all companies eager to remove drivers from behind the wheel, serverless computing poses a similar set of challenges as software eats further and further into the infrastructure stack.

When that happens, the driver (or in this case, the infrastructure) will disappear into the background and the car (in this case, software applications) will take center stage. Whether we’re talking driverless cars or serverless computing, it’s going to be a bumpy road ahead as companies start to adapt. Here’s a look at what will happen when software eats the infrastructure world.

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U.S. surveillance law may see no new protections for foreign targets

Any reform of a controversial U.S. law allowing the National Security Agency to spy on people overseas will likely focus on its impact on U.S. residents, without curbing its use elsewhere.

Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) expires on Dec. 31, and some digital rights groups are calling on Congress to overhaul the law to protect the privacy of residents of both the U.S. and other countries. Congress will almost certainly extend the provision in some form. 

But a congressional hearing on Wednesday focused largely on the NSA’s “inadvertent” collection of U.S. residents’ data, with little time given to the privacy concerns of people overseas.

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